faq

Transactional Analysis

TA is a popular form of talking therapy devised by Dr. Eric Berne, initially as a way to work with people suffering severe disturbance. He then went on to make it into an accessible system for exploring and understanding personality and how people relate to each other. TA is commonly used in individual or group therapy, working with children or whole schools, in couples counselling and a variety of settings. A key feature for many TA therapists is that they are able to share their method with their clients (if they wish), who then has the same tools to support them in everyday life. Often appreciated for it’s clarity and flexibility it forms deeper understanding of the self. As a solid base for me it allows freedom to add other techniques and approaches too.

It is a humanistic and compassionate theory that supports people to improve their relationships, their work life and or their personal anxieties and neuroses. I have also used it to explore childhood issues, loss, love and sex.

See basic concepts

Training and qualifications

Member of the British Association of Counsellors and Psychotherapists.

I hold a diploma in Transactional Analysis Counselling 4 years with Elan Training

BA(hons) Creative Arts 3 years Nottingham Trent University

Trained Psychodrama Auxiliary 1 year with Northern School of Psychodrama

I attend regular CPD and professional supervision including training on working with children, using creative arts, suicide prevention, diversity and disability training, Gestalt techniques, Action methods, working outdoors,…

£10 first session

I offer a reduced price 30 minute session for new clients to meet me and ask some questions.

I appreciate how hard it can be to find the right person to work with. A conversation can give us some time to decide if we will be able to work together, or of not, I am happy to refer other colleagues who may suit your needs.

I always recommend that clients meet or speak to 3 different therapists before making a decision. Finding a good match is possibly the greatest contributor to successful therapy.